Daytime long exposure: photography tips for smoothing water and blurring skies

    | Landscape | Photography Tips | 08/10/2013 00:01am
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    The best way to set up your camera for daytime long exposures

    The best way to set up your camera for daytime long exposures

    If the line is red on the electronic level, it means the camera isn’t level and the horizon will slope in the frame

    It’s important to take your time setting up your camera for a long exposure. Keeping the camera steady is a must, so make sure your tripod’s legs are on a firm base; make good use of any ledges or holes in rocks, or push the feet into sand or shingle.

    If it has one, take advantage of your DSLR’s electronic level: hit the Info button until it’s displayed on the rear screen, then tilt the camera left or right until the line turns green: this will ensure that your horizon is level.

    Loosely compose your shot, check the level, then fine-tune the framing. If you have an older camera body, you may need to use a hotshoe-mounted bubble level instead.

    Finally, make use of Live View. With a strong ND filter in front of the lens it can be hard if not impossible to make out the image through the viewfinder.

    PAGE 1: Using ND filters for daytime long exposures
    PAGE 2: How slow can you go in your daytime long exposure?
    PAGE 3: Calming the waters
    PAGE 4: The best way to set up your camera for daytime long exposures

    READ MORE

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    Posted on Tuesday, October 8th, 2013 at 12:01 am under Landscape, Photography Tips.

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