10 landscape photography mistakes every photographer makes (and how to fix them)

10 landscape photography mistakes every photographer makes (and how to fix them)

Landscape Photography Mistake No. 3: Image blurred

9 secrets to using a tripod like a pro: use a remote shutter release

Using a small aperture while keeping the sensitivity low to record the maximum amount of detail means using a slow shutter speed.

Unfortunately this brings the risk of camera shake, blur caused by ting accidental camera movements.

Rather than pushing up the sensitivity and introducing noise the best solution to this is to mount the camera on a good, solid tripod.

When you’re using a tripod make sure the locks are tightened well so there’s no slippage during the exposure.

You might also find it helpful to hang a weight such as your camera bag on the tripod to weigh it down and make it sturdier.

For the ultimate in camera shake avoidance, use mirror lock-up mode and trip the shutter remotely.

READ MORE

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Landscape Photography Mistake No. 4: Empty foreground

Final sunrise photography tips from our professional photographer: frame for foreground interest

When we look at a scene we tend to seek out details with our eyes and we manage to ignore uninteresting areas.

However, dull, featureless foregrounds act like a barrier in an image, they make it feel like you’re too far away from the point of interest.

This situation can be quite easily rectified by including something of interest in the foreground.

Final sunrise photography tips from our professional photographer: frame for foreground interest

This might be a patch of flowers, a few boulders or shells on a beach, for example, and it works especially well when this interest leads off towards the main view.

The idea is to have something of interest in the near, middle and far distance of the image.

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  • KG

    Sometimes I do wonder about this site/mag. The layout for the tips is awful, and then you hit us with an advert after 2 pages [well, I was] Just put these simple tips on ONE page, why on earth do you spread them across pages as if that meant there was more content!? I appreciate that the tips are for beginners, but I’m willing to bet most of them give up after 2 pages because of all the needless scrolling

  • ArieLex

    Hmm, I’m pretty sure the horizon in the 2nd image in No. 4 is not level. It does slope down a bit towards the land.

  • http://www.digitalcameraworld.com/ Jeff / Digital Camera World

    To address your points… we need ads to be able to give away free content. We could put it behind a paywall, but no one likes that.

    As for the multiple pages, wouldn’t you be scrolling more if it was all on one page? Anyway, in the past we’ve put everything on one page, and people complain about having to scroll endlessly down. Spread it out, and likewise people get upset. So our general rule is about 600-700 words per page. Most of our content on the site is 1-2 pages. This post, however, is 3000 words long!