How to photograph anything: best camera settings for wildlife photography

How to photograph anything: best camera settings for wildlife photography

Best camera settings to photograph garden birds

Best camera settings to photograph garden birds

Many species of garden birds are very small and move quickly, so you’ll need a long telephoto lens and fast reactions to get the best shots.

A common problem with shooting in the garden is that the background can be distracting, so use the widest aperture available on your lens to help to blur these distractions.

Although you’d normally position the main subject off-centre, you’ll find that the outer autofocus points on most cameras aren’t as reliable as the central one, especially when you’re shooting in low light.

So in these conditions, set the camera to this central autofocus point and position the subject in the middle of the frame.

How to set up your camera to photograph garden birds

How to set up your camera to photograph garden birds

Aperture   The widest available on your lens
To blur the background and enable you to use fast shutter speeds, you need to select the widest aperture that’s available on your lens.

How to set up your camera to photograph garden birds: focus mode

Focus mode    Single or one shot
When shooting birds perched on branches or twigs, use single or one shot autofocus and make sure that the camera has focused on the bird before shooting.

Exposure mode   Aperture priority (A or Av)

Shutter speed   Set by camera, but at least 1/500sec

ISO   400 or higher

Lens   300mm or longer

Drive mode   Continuous

White balance   Auto

PAGE 1: Best camera settings to photograph captive animals
PAGE 2: Best camera settings to photograph wild animals
PAGE 3: Best camera settings to photograph garden birds

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