Spring photography tips: how to photograph flowers in the wild

Spring photography tips: how to photograph flowers in the wild

Final spring photography tips for photographing wild flowers

Final spring photography tips for photographing wild flowers

Shoot early in the day
Subject movement from even the slightest of breezes is a real bugbear for flower photographers, and often results in soft shots. To minimise this problem, aim to shoot before or soon after sunrise when there is less chance of wind. An early start also increases the chance of capturing attractive dew or frost on your subject.

Enhance movement
If it’s really windy, use this to your advantage and shoot groups of flowers blowing in the breeze using a slow shutter speed of around 1/4 second to convey movement and create some interesting blurring. See this issue’s fold-out guide for more on creative shutter speed effects.

Control the light
To reveal more detail in the shadow areas, try bouncing light back onto the flower using a reflector, or add some fill-in flash. If you are forced to shoot in bright sunshine, cast your own shadow over the flower to reduce the contrast, or use a diffuser for softer lighting.

Expose manually
Bright or reflective flowers can fool your camera’s meter into under-exposing. Shooting in Manual mode and checking the histogram display will help you to overcome this.

PAGE 1: How to photograph flowers with the right backdrop
PAGE 2: A step-by-step guide on how to photograph flowers in the wild
PAGE 3: How to photograph flowers in the wild – think about the light

PAGE 4: Experiment with depth of field
PAGE 5: Final spring photography tips for photographing wild flowers

READ MORE

Depth of Field: what you need to now for successful images
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