Spring photography tips: how to photograph flowers in the wild

Spring photography tips: how to photograph flowers in the wild

Taking pictures of flowers in a controlled environment such as still life photography, or even in the confines of your garden is one thing. But learning how to photograph flowers in the wild presents a whole number of new challenges. In this quick guide we show you how to think about the light and how to experiment with the look and feel of your pictures.

Spring photography tips: how to photograph flowers in the wild

All words and images by Mark Hamblin

Compared to other aspects of nature photography, shooting wild plants and flowers is a stroll in the park. After all, they can’t run off and you don’t need to lug back-breaking lumps of glass around with you to get a decent shot.

What’s more, the diversity and abundance of plants means that you won’t have to venture far to find a subject, and now is the ideal time to give it a go.

How to photograph flowers with the right backdrop

There are a number of lenses that are suitable for flower photography, depending on the style of image you hope to capture. Most general purpose zooms that cover focal lengths of around 24mm to 135mm will give you plenty of options.

The wider end of this range will allow you to include the plant or flower as part of its surroundings, helping to put it into context. The use of a wide-angle also increases depth of field, so the subject and backdrop can be recorded in sharp focus.

A short to mid telephoto is useful if you want to isolate an individual flower by throwing the background out of focus. It’s also possible to reduce the minimum focusing distance of a telephoto by fitting extension tubes.

These inexpensive glass-less tubes fit between the camera and lens and are an effective alternative to a macro lens. For serious close-up work though, use a 1:1 macro so you can hone in on the fine details.

PAGE 1: How to photograph flowers with the right backdrop
PAGE 2: A step-by-step guide on how to photograph flowers in the wild
PAGE 3: How to photograph flowers in the wild – think about the light

PAGE 4: Experiment with depth of field
PAGE 5: Final spring photography tips for photographing wild flowers

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