9 creative photo ideas to try in April

02 Shoot still life photography with personality

06 Shoot faces in unusual places

06 Shoot faces in unusual places

Sometimes, photography can take itself far too seriously. Here’s a fun project that’s the perfect antidote.

All you need to do is keep your eye out (and your camera to hand) for inanimate objects that feature elements forming a rudimentary face.

Two eyes and a mouth is all you need for something to qualify – a nose and ears are icing on the cake. It’s not the sort of project that involves any pressure, as you can just take pictures as and when you happen to come across a suitable object.

Soon you’ll be spotting the photographic potential in plugholes, curtain rails, padlocks and all manner of subjects that you’d never previously considered training your lens on.

In terms of gear, the kit lens that came with your camera will be fine for the majority of subjects, although you may need a macro lens if you want frame-filling pictures of small objects..

Get started today…
* There are many websites and blogs where you’ll discover inspiration for this project – http://facesinplaces.blogspot.co.uk is a good place to start.
* Use Program mode or Aperture Priority for grab shots.
* Increase the ISO sensitivity to give you camera shake-reducing shutter speeds.
* If this fun faces project takes your fancy and you decide to go further into it, you might want to consider investing in a fast 50mm prime lens (with an aperture of f/1.8 or f.1.4) as this will give you far more flexibility when you’re shooting in low light.

PAGE 1: Shoot twilight portraits
PAGE 2: Shoot still life photography with personality
PAGE 3: Shoot a film noir style
PAGE 4: Shoot quiet landscapes
PAGE 5: Shoot out of focus
PAGE 6: Shoot faces in unusual places
PAGE 7: Shoot pictures of weather
PAGE 8: Shoot wildlife with long exposures
PAGE 9: Shoot baby sheep

READ MORE

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