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    Professional Photographer to the Rescue: pictures of castles that reign supreme

    | Landscape | Photography Tips | 22/02/2013 15:00pm
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    Our professional photographer’s recommended gear

    Our professional photographer's recommended gear for pictures of castles: depth of field tables

    Depth of field tables
    “This set of printed numbers is an effective way of ensuring I get as much of the scene sharp as possible,” says Chris.

    “Looking up the focal length and aperture, I can work out where to focus to maximise depth of field. My prime lenses have focus distance scales, making it easy to match the table’s prescribed perfect hyperfocal distance. Print tables for your DSLR and lenses.”

    Our professional photographer's recommended gear for pictures of castles: sun card

    Sun card
    “Contrary to popular opinion, the sun doesn’t rise in the east – it actually appears over the horizon anywhere from south-east to north-east, depending on the time of year and latitude,” says Chris.

    “So that I can be sure to track the sun and be in the right place for dawn and dusk, I carry this simple plastic card, which I use with a compass to find where the sun will be. From Sun Card (£4, $6.50).”

    Our professional photographer's recommended gear for pictures of castles: collapsible reflector

    Collapsible reflector
    “A collapsible reflector isn’t a common accessory for a landscape or wildlife photographer! It’s more often used by portrait specialists, but I find it particularly useful for bouncing light onto dark areas in the foreground of scenic shots, and to provide useful fill-in for nature close-ups. On this occasion, my assistant, Marc Chapman, did the honours, holding the reflector at an angle to bounce the flash so it lit up the dunes.”

    Our professional photographer's recommended gear for pictures of castles: sensor brush

    Visible Dust 8mm sensor brush
    “I noticed early on that Oliver’s sensor was very dirty, creating dark blobs in the sky on every picture he took,” says Chris. “Dust on the sensor is an occupational hazard for a pro, so I take my trusty Visible Dust 8mm Sensor Brush (£36, $42) and its box of accessories with me wherever I am in the world. It means I can clean up any specks as soon as they appear.”

    Our professional photographer's recommended gear for pictures of castles: prime lenses

    Prime lenses
    “I don’t carry any zoom lenses when I’m out shooting landscapes. I use a handful of prime lenses with fixed focal lengths of 20mm, 24mm, 28mm and 50mm,” says Chris.”

    “This means I can travel light, and it forces me to think carefully about composition and camera position. The lenses also provide focus scales that let me calculate hyperfocal distance. I mostly use primes for shooting wildlife, but rather than paying thousands for fast, long lenses that I only use occasionally, I hire them for assignments.”

    PAGE 1: Meet our professional photographer and apprentice
    PAGE 2: Castle photography tips for during the shoot
    PAGE 3: Final tips from our professional photographer
    PAGE 4: Our professional photographer’s recommended gear for pictures of castles
    PAGE 5: Shot of the Day

    READ MORE

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    Pro secrets: how to use a telephoto lens for awesome landscapes
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    Posted on Friday, February 22nd, 2013 at 3:00 pm under Landscape, Photography Tips.

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