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    15 common photography questions from beginners (and how to solve them)

    | Photography for Beginners | 06/02/2013 15:52pm
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    Common Photography Questions From Beginners, 4-5

    Common photography questions: why are my shots blurry?

    04 Why are my shots blurry?

    Image Stabilisation (IS) is great for helping to avoid ‘camera shake’ when shooting handheld, as it enables you to use fairly slow shutter speeds to get sharp shots, but to get sharp shots of moving subjects you’ll need a fast shutter speed to freeze your subject’s movement.

    This counts for all moving subjects, even if they’re only moving very slightly, such as people, insects, boats in harbours, etc.

    Common photography questions: why are my shots blurry?

    The best way to control shutter speed is to shoot using the Shutter Priority mode; you set the shutter speed, and your camera will set the aperture for a sharp shot.

    If the lighting conditions are flat and your shutter speeds are still too slow to freeze any action in shot, then increase your ISO setting (try ISO400, 800 or 1600) to obtain a faster shutter speed – eg 1/250 sec instead of 1/25 sec.

     

    Common photography questions: why would I want to control depth of field?

    f/4

    Common photography questions: why would I want to control depth of field?

    f/5.6

    Common photography questions: why would I want to control depth of field?

    f/8

    Common photography questions: why would I want to control depth of field?

    f/11

    Common photography questions: why would I want to control depth of field?

    f/16

    Common photography questions: why would I want to control depth of field?

    f/22

    05 Why would I want to control depth of field?

    Depth of field is one of the most powerful camera effects available to photographers. Being able to decide how to direct people’s eye to certain aspects of a scene, by blurring the foreground and background, can have a dramatic effect on your results.

    So how do you control depth of field? With your aperture setting! This varies depending on your lens.

    Using a wide aperture (eg f/4 or f/5.6) captures a shallow depth of field, blurring backgrounds to help subjects stand out; conversely, a narrow aperture (eg f/16 or f/22) captures a large depth of field, keeping everything from foreground to background ‘acceptably’ sharp.

    Be aware that changing the aperture affects shutter speed. A wide aperture lets in more light, so you need a faster shutter speed for an accurate exposure; a narrow aperture lets in less light, so you’ll need a slower shutter speed.

    PAGE 1: Common photography questions from beginners, 1-2
    PAGE 2: Common photography questions from beginners, 3
    PAGE 3: Common photography questions from beginners, 4-5
    PAGE 4: Common photography questions from beginners, 6-7
    PAGE 5: Common photography questions from beginners, 8-9
    PAGE 6: Common photography questions from beginners, 10-11
    PAGE 7: Common photography questions from beginners, 12-13
    PAGE 8: Common photography questions from beginners, 14-15

    READ MORE

    Getting sharp images: every technique you need to know starting out
    Digital camera modes explained: choose the best shooting mode for your subject


    Posted on Wednesday, February 6th, 2013 at 3:52 pm under Photography for Beginners.

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