Colour management: fine tune your kit for the most accurate colours possible

How to print more than one photo on a page

How to set up Photoshop to print well

One of the main reasons why people find their prints don’t match what appears on their computer screen is down to improper settings in Photoshop’s Print Dialog. Follow these tips for pictures that will more closely match what you see on screen.

1 – Colour Space

Check that you’re using the right colour space – it should be Adobe RGB or sRGB.

2 – Management

If using an ICC profile select Photoshop otherwise choose Printer.

3 – ICC Profile

Choose the correct profile for the printer and the paper that you’re using.

4 – Rendering

See the guide below to decide which type of rending intent to use.

5 – The proof

Tick the box to get an indication of how your image will look when printed.

Photoshop Rendering Intent: Which one’s right?

If an image has some ‘out of gamut’ colours, Photoshop needs to know how to handle those colours. The way of handling colours is called a rendering intent. Photoshop can render colours that are too bright or too saturated for your printer in one of four ways.

1. Perceptual

This intent ensures that all colours fit within the colour gamut of your printer. It preserves the relationships between the colours but squeezes them into the available colour space. Use this as your default for printing photos.

2. Relative colormetric

Here any colours ‘in gamut’ are left unchanged. Colours ‘out of gamut’ are clipped. Colours too saturated or bright for your printer are clipped to fit. This is best used for CMYK to CMYK printing.

3. Saturation

This intent squashes colours into a desired colour space but it alters the relationship between the colours. It’s best for printing vibrant graphics.

4. Absolute colourmetric

Similar to Relative Colormetric but it takes into account the white point of the paper you’re printing on. It’s good for proofing packaging or newsprint.

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