asdf

    Shutter speed tricks to improve your flowing water pictures

    | Photography Tutorials | 10/07/2009 14:19pm
    0 Comments

    Slow shutter speeds bring out the beauty of waterfalls and streams

    A photo of a running stream, a babbling brook or a cascading waterfall can be transformed from a mere snap into an atmospheric masterpiece. This can be done simply by slowing the camera’s shutter speed so that the water is turned into a smooth and flowing ribbon of liquid. The effect is easy to achieve and even newcomers to photography can enjoy the creative possibilities that this technique can offer.

    A photo of a running stream, a babbling brook or a cascading waterfall can be transformed from a mere snap into an atmospheric masterpiece.

    This can be done simply by slowing the camera’s shutter speed so that the water is turned into a smooth and flowing ribbon of liquid. The effect is easy to achieve and even newcomers to photography can enjoy the creative possibilities that this technique can offer.

    Essential gear

    ND Filter –

    Cuts down the amount of light reaching the camera sensor and enables slower shutter speeds.

    Tripod

    - A vital tool for long exposures. Get a sturdy model with enough adjustable height and stability

    Remote release -

    To reduce the possibility of any camera shake, a remote release should be used.

    What will happen if I dont use an ND filter?

    Either you wont get a slow enough shutter speed or your image will be overexposed.

    Shake-free photographs

    Using a tripod in the field is essential in order to keep the surroundings super-sharp while the water becomes creamy with movement. As exposures will run into seconds, rather than fractions of, youll need to ensure its sturdy and stable.

    To get these shots we had to rest two legs on the side of the rock face and hold the third in position with our hands for stability.

    The best shutter speed?

    The length of time the shutter is open will dictate how the water looks on the final image. It all depends on the speed the water is flowing really, but anything above 1/500 sec will freeze the action while dropping it down to 1/160, the movement starts to show.


    Posted on Friday, July 10th, 2009 at 2:19 pm under Photography Tutorials.

    Tags: , , , , ,

    Share This Page